Favorite Travel Quotes

"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts."
-- Mark Twain
Innocents Abroad

"Stop worrying about the potholes in the road and celebrate the journey." -- Fitzhugh Mullan

"A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving." -- Lao Tzu

Archive for March, 2014

Day In the Life of A Gila Woodpecker

posted: March 26th, 2014 | by:Bert

©Bert Gildart:  For the past few days I have been obsessed with creating images of one of the primary birds that makes its home in the saguaro cactus, specifically, the Gila woodpecker. Opportunities have been many and have included feeding shots on the ocotillo cactus, the actual excavation of a cavity in the saguaro cactus, and the occupancy of a cavity (I’m working several cavities) in which adults are now beginning to raise their young.


GilaWoodpecker-30

Gila woodpecker feeding (or pollinating) Ocotillo

 

Gila woodpeckers are one of the more showy species of the Sonoran Desert.  As always, the male is the more showy of the two sexes, sporting a red cap on top of the head.  Females and juveniles are similar, but both lack the red cap of the adult male.

According to a site maintained by Saguaro National Park near Tucson, Gila woodpeckers create nest cavities in the sides of saguaros in between the skin and the inner ribs (the outer cortex) of the cactus. With the saguaro tissue serving as insulation, these cavities provide safety from predators and refuge from extreme temperatures. Abandoned woodpecker holes make great nests for elf owls, kestrels, and purple martins.

But according to other reports, populations may be in decline because of competition for nesting sites, and we did note that other species occupied nearby saguaro cacti to include the house sparrow.  But the major problem, and one which is proving to be universally destructive to wildlife, is the endless constructions of housing developments.


GilaWoodpecker-15 GilaWoodpecker-9 GilaWoodpecker-24


L to R:  Male Gila peering from recently created cavity; female Gila atop century plant, now in bloom; male Gila and ocotillo flower.


Certainly as you can see from the top image, the Gila could be a pollinator of the ocotillo cactus, for it spent enough time on flowers of the ocotillo.  And the bird could not have struck more interesting poses.

First it landed among countless thorns on both upright and on branches that had begun to droop.  Then it inserted its beak into the flower, and whether or not it was extracting anything other than nectar was difficult to determine.

All these images have been made while based once again at the Gilbert Ray Campground just outside of Tucson.  Today, however, we depart and start heading north, knowing, however, that we will come back another day.


——————-

 

AIRSTREAM TRAVELS LAST YEAR:

*Ocotillo Cacti

 

4th ed. Autographed by the Authors

Hiking Shenandoah National Park

Hiking Shenandoah National Park is the 4th edition of a favorite guide book, created by Bert & Janie, a professional husband-wife journalism team. Lots of updates including more waterfall trails, updated descriptions of confusing trail junctions, and new color photographs. New text describes more of the park’s compelling natural history. Often the descriptions are personal as the Gildarts have hiked virtually every single park trail, sometimes repeatedly.

$18.95 + Autographed Copy


Big Sky Country is beautiful

Montana Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Treasure State

Montana Icons is a book for lovers of the western vista. Features photographs of fifty famous landmarks from what many call the “Last Best Place.” The book will make you feel homesick for Montana even if you already live here. Bert Gildart’s varied careers in Montana (Bus driver on an Indian reservation, a teacher, backcountry ranger, as well as a newspaper reporter, and photographer) have given him a special view of Montana, which he shares in this book. Share the view; click here.

$16.95 + Autographed Copy


What makes Glacier, Glacier?

Glacier Icons: 50 Classic Views of the Crown of the Continent

Glacier Icons: What makes Glacier Park so special? In this book you can discover the story behind fifty of this park’s most amazing features. With this entertaining collection of photos, anecdotes and little known facts, Bert Gildart will be your backcountry guide. A former Glacier backcountry ranger turned writer/photographer, his hundreds of stories and images have appeared in literally dozens of periodicals including Time/Life, Smithsonian, and Field & Stream. Take a look at Glacier Icons

$16.95 + Autographed Copy




Read Comments | 2 Comments »

Significant Organ Pipe National Monument Reopening

posted: March 22nd, 2014 | by:Bert

©Bert Gildart:  Here are a few images that tell a story of a very significant place, one we’re been enjoying these past few days.

Most notable is the one of Janie framed by a cave punched by weather into some igneous rock.  The cave is one of many and all are adjacent to Dripping Springs in Organ Pipe National Monument.  Our visit is notable because this area of the park has been closed for the past 12 years.


DrippingSprings-3

One of many small caves near Dripping Springs

 


In 2002, as reported in blogs over the years, Chris Eggle was shot to death in Organ Pipe National Monument  trying to protect visitors from the danger imposed by desperate drug smugglers.  Mexico is just five miles to our south and until recently established drug routes have coursed their way through this outstanding area of the Sonoran Desert, representing, therefore, a continuous source of danger.

But the work of park rangers and the Border Patrol has improved conditions.  As a result, park officials reopened six miles of the Puerto Blanco Road this past December.

Visitation to Dripping Springs is based on a quota system, and right now only five vehicles can travel the bumpy road at any one time.  With a permit,  bicyclists, however, can visit anytime.


DrippingSprings-8 WaterTanks DrippingSprings-6


L TO R:  Janie gazing over Sonoran Desert from Dripping Springs; biking to road to Springs, but stopping near compassionate Water Tanks; Janie and Springs.

Park officials say if this experimental opening is successful, they are hoping to reopen the remaining 30-plus miles.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful, they say, if we could open the rest of the park?

Have not talked to anyone who would disagree.


——————–

 

AIRSTREAM TRAVELS THREE YEARS AGO:

*Are Birds Political Creatures?  You Bet

 

 

4th ed. Autographed by the Authors

Hiking Shenandoah National Park

Hiking Shenandoah National Park is the 4th edition of a favorite guide book, created by Bert & Janie, a professional husband-wife journalism team. Lots of updates including more waterfall trails, updated descriptions of confusing trail junctions, and new color photographs. New text describes more of the park’s compelling natural history. Often the descriptions are personal as the Gildarts have hiked virtually every single park trail, sometimes repeatedly.

$18.95 + Autographed Copy


Big Sky Country is beautiful

Montana Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Treasure State

Montana Icons is a book for lovers of the western vista. Features photographs of fifty famous landmarks from what many call the “Last Best Place.” The book will make you feel homesick for Montana even if you already live here. Bert Gildart’s varied careers in Montana (Bus driver on an Indian reservation, a teacher, backcountry ranger, as well as a newspaper reporter, and photographer) have given him a special view of Montana, which he shares in this book. Share the view; click here.

$16.95 + Autographed Copy


What makes Glacier, Glacier?

Glacier Icons: 50 Classic Views of the Crown of the Continent

Glacier Icons: What makes Glacier Park so special? In this book you can discover the story behind fifty of this park’s most amazing features. With this entertaining collection of photos, anecdotes and little known facts, Bert Gildart will be your backcountry guide. A former Glacier backcountry ranger turned writer/photographer, his hundreds of stories and images have appeared in literally dozens of periodicals including Time/Life, Smithsonian, and Field & Stream. Take a look at Glacier Icons

$16.95 + Autographed Copy





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Whimsical Travels — to Optmize Photography

posted: March 19th, 2014 | by:Bert


©Bert Gildart:  Seldom have our travels ever been planned travels, and that is certainly true of the past few days.  We had no plans to stay another few days in Borrego Springs, and we certainly had no real plans to wind up where we are now – in Organ Pipe National Monument.  Travels such as these are made on the spur of the moment, and usually they’re made, changed — whatever — because we hear that interesting natural history things are starting to happen.


FanPalms-10

Fan palms as seen during moon rise from our Airstream at Borrego State Park

 

Some of our friends make travel plans over a year in advance. But we seldom know for sure what tomorrow will bring, much less any of the tomorrows contained in 365 days.  We call such travels “Whimsical Travels.”  And that’s the category into which most of our travels must be grouped. For one thing, we think it optimizes photographic opportunities.

We spent several days in Anza Borrego State Park and did so initially because Springs of Borrego was booked solid.  But then when we saw how beautiful each sunrise was turning out to be, and then how beautiful the evening moonrise – in all of its full-moon glory – was turning out to be, we extended by two days.



FanPalms-9 FanPalms-5 FanPalms-2

 

L to R:  Moonrise as seen from our campsite at Borrego Desert State Park.  Airstream at overflow campsite in Springs of Borrego.  Stand of palms reached after several mile hike up Palm Canyon.  Trail is immediately adjacent to state campground.


During that time we got a note from Chuck (one of our Peg Leg friends who had proceeded us by about a week) saying some of the cacti in Organ Pipe, Arizona, were starting to bloom, so now we are now camped next to the Mexican border. And, yes, some of the cacti are blooming, not the masses we’ve seen in previous years, but enough to make the trip worthwhile.


Organ Pipe-7 Ocotillo Organ Pipe-2


L to R: We think the flowers on the left and far right are both staghorn cholla.  If not, then one may be a buckhorn cholla.  The two species are known to hybridize confusing I.D.  The center picture is an ocotillo, and note that it is blooming and that THERE ARE NO LEAVES.  Leaves may accompany flowers but only when an adequate amount of rain has fallen.  Flowers, however, bloom independent of rain and are timed to bloom in April, synchronizing with the return of the hummingbirds, their pollinators.

We’ll be here for a few more days, then, we’ll do as I said we’d do in a previous posting: we’ll follow the Swenson’s Hawk, and like it, we’ll look for “staging areas,” areas where we can regroup and fuel back up. In a way, its travels are a bit whimsical, though we probably set the record.


———————

 

AIRSTREAM TRAVELS THREE YEARS AGO:

*Burrowing Owls and the Bizarre Nest Needed to Survive

 

4th ed. Autographed by the Authors

Hiking Shenandoah National Park

Hiking Shenandoah National Park is the 4th edition of a favorite guide book, created by Bert & Janie, a professional husband-wife journalism team. Lots of updates including more waterfall trails, updated descriptions of confusing trail junctions, and new color photographs. New text describes more of the park’s compelling natural history. Often the descriptions are personal as the Gildarts have hiked virtually every single park trail, sometimes repeatedly.

$18.95 + Autographed Copy


Big Sky Country is beautiful

Montana Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Treasure State

Montana Icons is a book for lovers of the western vista. Features photographs of fifty famous landmarks from what many call the “Last Best Place.” The book will make you feel homesick for Montana even if you already live here. Bert Gildart’s varied careers in Montana (Bus driver on an Indian reservation, a teacher, backcountry ranger, as well as a newspaper reporter, and photographer) have given him a special view of Montana, which he shares in this book. Share the view; click here.

$16.95 + Autographed Copy


What makes Glacier, Glacier?

Glacier Icons: 50 Classic Views of the Crown of the Continent

Glacier Icons: What makes Glacier Park so special? In this book you can discover the story behind fifty of this park’s most amazing features. With this entertaining collection of photos, anecdotes and little known facts, Bert Gildart will be your backcountry guide. A former Glacier backcountry ranger turned writer/photographer, his hundreds of stories and images have appeared in literally dozens of periodicals including Time/Life, Smithsonian, and Field & Stream. Take a look at Glacier Icons

$16.95 + Autographed Copy




Read Comments | 2 Comments »

See You

posted: March 14th, 2014 | by:Bert

©Bert Gildart: It is intended that Janie’s gesture suggest a certain nostalgia as we make ready to leave the Sonoran Desert. While here we’ve camped at Gilbert Ray, Peg Leg, Springs of Borrego and, today, we’re moving for a few nights to the State Park because Springs of Borrego is full.


Janie

Janie bidding a fair adieu to our many Sonoran Desert friends. Note our Airstream toward upper left.


The focus of our stay in each has been to learn more about the Sonoran’s natural history.  A few flowers are starting to pop up and last night we watched from our RV pad as dozens of Swenson’s Hawks circled over our heads.  They’ve wintered in South America, places as distant as Argentina, and they’re returning.  From here they’ll disperse, some settling in Montana, Alberta and other areas in the Northwest.  Each year about 300 Swenson’s move through the area, making this a particularly dramatic event.

CactusWren BarnOwl PrairieFalcon


L to R:  Cactus Wren, Barn Owl, Prairie Falcon

 

Monday we’ll leave the State Park and then we’ll follow the Swenson’s, moving north.  Like these hawks we may find a few “staging areas” along the way where we’ll take time to regroup and enjoy attractions in these new areas.   In the meantime, we say goodbye to the many friends. We’ve biked extreme areas with Ron, shared a glass of early morning wine with Tony and Betty, watched birds with Mike, Randy.  We’ve learned about Chinese history (see below) with Bill and Larry, and  studied the stars with Ted and Carol.  And we’ve climbed Coyote Peak with some very special friends,  Don and Nancy.

Sadly, some may not be back but our memories are so vivid that they’ll always be with us.  So we won’t say goodby, rather we’ll do as native friends in Alaska do, and simply say, “See you.”


—————-

*AIRSTREAM TRAVELS TWO YEARS AGO:

Year of the Dragon

 

 

4th ed. Autographed by the Authors

Hiking Shenandoah National Park

Hiking Shenandoah National Park is the 4th edition of a favorite guide book, created by Bert & Janie, a professional husband-wife journalism team. Lots of updates including more waterfall trails, updated descriptions of confusing trail junctions, and new color photographs. New text describes more of the park’s compelling natural history. Often the descriptions are personal as the Gildarts have hiked virtually every single park trail, sometimes repeatedly.

$18.95 + Autographed Copy


Big Sky Country is beautiful

Montana Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Treasure State

Montana Icons is a book for lovers of the western vista. Features photographs of fifty famous landmarks from what many call the “Last Best Place.” The book will make you feel homesick for Montana even if you already live here. Bert Gildart’s varied careers in Montana (Bus driver on an Indian reservation, a teacher, backcountry ranger, as well as a newspaper reporter, and photographer) have given him a special view of Montana, which he shares in this book. Share the view; click here.

$16.95 + Autographed Copy


What makes Glacier, Glacier?

Glacier Icons: 50 Classic Views of the Crown of the Continent

Glacier Icons: What makes Glacier Park so special? In this book you can discover the story behind fifty of this park’s most amazing features. With this entertaining collection of photos, anecdotes and little known facts, Bert Gildart will be your backcountry guide. A former Glacier backcountry ranger turned writer/photographer, his hundreds of stories and images have appeared in literally dozens of periodicals including Time/Life, Smithsonian, and Field & Stream. Take a look at Glacier Icons

$16.95 + Autographed Copy




 

Read Comments | 1 Comment »

Tony Feather Performance Will Benefit Borrego Children

posted: March 5th, 2014 | by:Bert

©Bert Gildart: Our friend Tony Feathers will be playing at the Performing Arts Center in Borrego Springs this Friday night.  Tony and his wife Betty were some of the first people we meet while camped at Peg Leg about five years ago.  He was playing his guitar around a campfire and we asked if we might join.  Since that time we have remained in frequent contact.

TonyFeather-3

Our friend Tony Feather providing Janie and me with fun-filled night -- a "private concert."

 

Back in Tennessee, Tony has his own band known as the Blue Sky Town. He has cut several CDs and placed high in the prestigious Chris Autin Song Writing Competition at the MerlFest.  He has been interviewed by and played on National Public Radio.

About a week ago he and Betty again joined us at Peg Leg where he entertained us as we all sat inside our trailer, and that’s where I took a number of new photos of Tony.  It was a fun evening, and his music reminds us a bit of the genre popularized by John Prine and Lyle Lovette.   Tony says his music is best described as “eclectic Americana,” Songs as reflected by titles that include Old Black Crow, Hop On My Pony and Ride, and Forty Miles From Mexico. Funds raised by the performance are intended to help the children of Borrego Springs.

We’re back in Borrego and camped at the same RV resort at which we stayed last year.  The resort is best known for its “Greens,” and though we’re not golfers we find that many other aren’t either.  They’re here because of its central location to all that Anza Borrego Desert State Park has to offer, and because of the resort’s amenities, such as the hot tubs and the exercise rooms.

Janie’s brother and sister-in-law will be joining us for Tony’s performance.  They’re from L.A. and we’re all looking forward to the Friday night concert.  It appears as though it will be a sellout.

*Cacti and Macro Photography

—————–

 

AIRSTREAM TRAVELS TWO YEARS AGO:

 

 

4th ed. Autographed by the Authors

Hiking Shenandoah National Park

Hiking Shenandoah National Park is the 4th edition of a favorite guide book, created by Bert & Janie, a professional husband-wife journalism team. Lots of updates including more waterfall trails, updated descriptions of confusing trail junctions, and new color photographs. New text describes more of the park’s compelling natural history. Often the descriptions are personal as the Gildarts have hiked virtually every single park trail, sometimes repeatedly.

$18.95 + Autographed Copy


Big Sky Country is beautiful

Montana Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Treasure State

Montana Icons is a book for lovers of the western vista. Features photographs of fifty famous landmarks from what many call the “Last Best Place.” The book will make you feel homesick for Montana even if you already live here. Bert Gildart’s varied careers in Montana (Bus driver on an Indian reservation, a teacher, backcountry ranger, as well as a newspaper reporter, and photographer) have given him a special view of Montana, which he shares in this book. Share the view; click here.

$16.95 + Autographed Copy


What makes Glacier, Glacier?

Glacier Icons: 50 Classic Views of the Crown of the Continent

Glacier Icons: What makes Glacier Park so special? In this book you can discover the story behind fifty of this park’s most amazing features. With this entertaining collection of photos, anecdotes and little known facts, Bert Gildart will be your backcountry guide. A former Glacier backcountry ranger turned writer/photographer, his hundreds of stories and images have appeared in literally dozens of periodicals including Time/Life, Smithsonian, and Field & Stream. Take a look at Glacier Icons

$16.95 + Autographed Copy




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It’s Lucky to be “Brushed By A Feather”

posted: March 4th, 2014 | by:Bert

©Bert Gildart:  Before naturalists at Arizona’s Sonoran Desert Museum begin their Raptor Free Flight Program, they warn you about “Space.”  The bird’s space – and your space.

“Keep children off your shoulders and your hands below your head,” they warn.  “Your space is from the top of your head to the soles of your shoes.  Everything else belongs to these raptors.”

FreeFlight-2

About to be "brushed by a feather."

 

The warning is necessary, for birds, as explained in my last posting, zip from one side of the viewing path to the other side.  Because their speed and exact direction of flight is so unpredictable, it is a challenge to photograph them, despite the level of trust these birds place in their handlers.


FreeFlight-1

Mini-seconds later -- "Brushed by a Feather."

 

To make this picture I had to make some special camera adjustments.  I upped the ISO and set the camera’s shutter so I could make quick-fire exposures.  Then I tried to pre-focus on a spot where I thought this Gray Hawk’s flight might take it.  It’s a technique I tried to perfect while covering the World Eskimo Indian Olympics in Fairbanks several years ago for Native Peoples Magazine, so I’d had some experience.

I got my shot and then recalled another of our narrator’s comments.  “If you get brushed by a feather, you will have good luck for the next 50 years!”

Because of this image I believe I was lucky, but so, it seems were several other spectators, for surely they got brushed by a feather, perhaps even several.


—————-

 

AIRSTREAM TRAVELS TWO YEARS AGO:


*Burrowing Owls and the Bizarre Nests Needed to Survive


4th ed. Autographed by the Authors

Hiking Shenandoah National Park

Hiking Shenandoah National Park is the 4th edition of a favorite guide book, created by Bert & Janie, a professional husband-wife journalism team. Lots of updates including more waterfall trails, updated descriptions of confusing trail junctions, and new color photographs. New text describes more of the park’s compelling natural history. Often the descriptions are personal as the Gildarts have hiked virtually every single park trail, sometimes repeatedly.

$18.95 + Autographed Copy


Big Sky Country is beautiful

Montana Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Treasure State

Montana Icons is a book for lovers of the western vista. Features photographs of fifty famous landmarks from what many call the “Last Best Place.” The book will make you feel homesick for Montana even if you already live here. Bert Gildart’s varied careers in Montana (Bus driver on an Indian reservation, a teacher, backcountry ranger, as well as a newspaper reporter, and photographer) have given him a special view of Montana, which he shares in this book. Share the view; click here.

$16.95 + Autographed Copy


What makes Glacier, Glacier?

Glacier Icons: 50 Classic Views of the Crown of the Continent

Glacier Icons: What makes Glacier Park so special? In this book you can discover the story behind fifty of this park’s most amazing features. With this entertaining collection of photos, anecdotes and little known facts, Bert Gildart will be your backcountry guide. A former Glacier backcountry ranger turned writer/photographer, his hundreds of stories and images have appeared in literally dozens of periodicals including Time/Life, Smithsonian, and Field & Stream. Take a look at Glacier Icons

$16.95 + Autographed Copy





Read Comments | Post a Comment »

The Magnificence of Birds in Flight

posted: March 3rd, 2014 | by:Bert


©Bert Gildart: For almost a week we’ve been visiting the Arizona Sonoran Desert Museum on a daily basis. Programs are many but one we’ve consistently attended is the Raptor Free Flight demonstration.  It’s always exciting, but think of us waiting as we did yesterday for the return of a Red Tail Hawk. Apparently it had been diverted by its sighting of real prey rather than by the morsels of food handlers have been placing atop pads of cacti.  Would it return?  That was the concern of its handlers.

“Occasionally,” said Carol Hemmingway, the museum docent conducting the morning program, “one of our birds takes off.  And it may not come back for an hour, a day or even several days.  We have no real control over them.  Just the other day our Red Tail Hawk found a bull snake, and because she’s not a skilled hunter, it was too much for her.  She let it go, but then she returned.”


SonoranMuseum-19

Beauty and power of flight, partially expressed by extended primaries. Harris's Hawk.

 

Because of action and potential for suspense, the Raptor Free Flight exhibition is one of the museum’s most popular program.  Naturalists began the program in 1996, and did so using several  captive birds that they had worked hard to condition.  Time has shown that’s really the only way it will work.  “We can’t even use rescued birds,” said another docent, “for eventually they want to take off and resume their wild ways.  We need birds we’ve conditioned. Some may come from wild nests where adults have been killed. Those birds need our help.”

Currently, bird species used for the program include the Chihuahuan Raven, Harris’s Hawk, a Barn Owl, Great Horned Owl, Gray Hawk, Ferruginous Hawk, Peregrine Falcon, and the Prairie Falcon, but before the program begins the narrator explains the concept of “space.”  Most importantly, your space.

“Birds know their space,” says the docent.  “You probably don’t.  Your space is from the top of your head to the soles of your shoes.”  Just a few minutes into the program that precaution was dramatized.


SonoranMuseum-18 SonoranMuseum-17 SonoranMuseum-14


L to R:  Morsels of food and hand moves serve to direct the flight of birds, which can attract hundreds of spectators.  Again, morsels of food control where a bird, the Gray Hawk,  will perch. 

 

Over one-hundred of us are now lined up along a 12-foot wide path delineated on each side by two 100-yard-long cabled fences.  Though our Red Tail has apparently forgotten its lessons, museum birds have been conditioned by trainers to land at specific spots lured in each time by a morsel of food.  Food might be a recently frozen (dead of course) mouse which managers purchase commercially.  And now the action begins.

Several trainers place food items onto the branch of a saguaro cactus and we all watch as a Barn Owl swoops to snatch the morsel – and then gulp it down.  On the other side of the fence another trainer waves his hand and secures yet another morsel of food.  The bird fixes its attention on the food, flaps its wings vigorously and zooms to the other side of the path.  And this is what is so exciting, for as the bird powers toward the food it is just inches above our heads.

“See!” exclaims Carol. “That’s why we don’t want you placing small children on your shoulders?”  The remark draws a hearty but nervous laugh.

Other species are also used to include a prairie falcon and its speed and maneuverability draws more gasps.  “Prairie falcons,” says Carol Hemmingway, “can dive at 200 miles per hour, making them one of the fastest of all birds.  Only the Peregrine Falcon may be faster.”


SonoranMuseum-5

Grace of the Great horned owl in flight

 

Though already listening closely, my ears really perk when Carol says that although there are 30 potential prairie falcon nesting sites in Arizona, only one remains.  “Critical habitat is being lost to human expansion,” she emphasizes. And that, without her saying, is another reason the educational efforts of the museum are so important.

But what’s happened to our Red Tail Hawk?

The program lasted over half an hour, and just moments after our group began to disband, the Red Tail returned. “You can see that we don’t really control the birds,” says Carol.  “But the birds are pretty smart and know from conditioning that this is where they want to stay.”

Another wonderful day at the Sonoran Desert Museum.


—————-

 

AIRSTREAM TRAVELS THIS TIME LAST YEAR

*Salton Sea


4th ed. Autographed by the Authors

Hiking Shenandoah National Park

Hiking Shenandoah National Park is the 4th edition of a favorite guide book, created by Bert & Janie, a professional husband-wife journalism team. Lots of updates including more waterfall trails, updated descriptions of confusing trail junctions, and new color photographs. New text describes more of the park’s compelling natural history. Often the descriptions are personal as the Gildarts have hiked virtually every single park trail, sometimes repeatedly.

$18.95 + Autographed Copy


Big Sky Country is beautiful

Montana Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Treasure State

Montana Icons is a book for lovers of the western vista. Features photographs of fifty famous landmarks from what many call the “Last Best Place.” The book will make you feel homesick for Montana even if you already live here. Bert Gildart’s varied careers in Montana (Bus driver on an Indian reservation, a teacher, backcountry ranger, as well as a newspaper reporter, and photographer) have given him a special view of Montana, which he shares in this book. Share the view; click here.

$16.95 + Autographed Copy


What makes Glacier, Glacier?

Glacier Icons: 50 Classic Views of the Crown of the Continent

Glacier Icons: What makes Glacier Park so special? In this book you can discover the story behind fifty of this park’s most amazing features. With this entertaining collection of photos, anecdotes and little known facts, Bert Gildart will be your backcountry guide. A former Glacier backcountry ranger turned writer/photographer, his hundreds of stories and images have appeared in literally dozens of periodicals including Time/Life, Smithsonian, and Field & Stream. Take a look at Glacier Icons

$16.95 + Autographed Copy




 

 

 



Read Comments | 1 Comment »

Rain In Tucson

posted: March 1st, 2014 | by:Bert


©Bert Gildart:  From what we hear, it has been months since Tucson experienced rain.  But all that changed today. Though rain wasn’t torrential, it did rain, and when the day was complete, it closed with an incredible rainbow.

Rainbow-2

Rainbow at end rain preceded by long overdue rains


 

We’re still camped at Gilbert Ray not far from the Sonoran Desert Museum, and this is what we saw just outside our trailer.  Hope your day was as satisfying.

Read Comments | 5 Comments »